An East African Single Tourist Visa is under consideration by the relevant sectoral authorities under the East African Community (EAC) integration program. If approved the visa will be valid for all five partner states in the EAC (Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Rwanda and Burundi). Under the proposal for the visa, any new East African single visa can be issued by any partner state's embassy. The visa proposal followed an appeal by the tourist boards of the partner states for a common visa to accelerate promotion of the region as a single tourist destination and the EAC Secretariat wants it approved before November's World Travel Fair (or World Travel Market) in London.[96] When approved by the East African council of ministers, tourists could apply for one country's entry visa, which would then be applicable in all regional member states as a single entry requirement initiative.[97] This is considered also by COMESA.
The validity of a U.S. work permit, also referred to as an Employment Authorization Document (EAD), will vary. The time-frame is dependent on the applicant’s current legal status in the U.S., whether this is the applicant’s first time applying, or if it is being renewed. If a person obtained his or her work permit while applying for Adjustment of Status (AOS) for the first time, their work permit is likely to be valid for one year, unless otherwise specified by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).
Some countries apply the principle of reciprocity in their visa policy. A country's visa policy is called 'reciprocal' if it imposes visa requirement against citizens of all the countries that impose visa requirements against its own citizens. The opposite is rarely true: a country rarely lifts visa requirements against citizens of all the countries that also lift visa requirements against its own citizens, unless a prior bilateral agreement has been made.
A social security card is used in the U.S. as way to prove your identity. Each social security card has a 9-digit social security number (SSN). This number is unique to each person and used for the purpose of tracking an individual in the U.S. Social Security Administration. All people who work in the U.S. must have a SSN. SSNs are mostly used for tax purposes.
The term “visa” is a shortening of a Latin phrase, carta visa, which means “the document has been seen.” These documents take a number of forms, ranging from tourist to immigration visas, and each type has its own application process. For example, someone who wants to enter a country to do business would need to apply for a business visa, while someone who planned to relocate to a country would apply for an immigration visa that would allow him to enter the country and stay there for a set period of time while pursuing citizenship or residency permits.
A visa is a stamp, sticker, or electronic record sitting inside your passport book that verifies that you’re allowed to stay in a specific country for a certain amount of time. They specify the length of your stay, what territories you may visit, your scheduled date of entry, how many times you may enter the country, and whether or not you’re allowed to study or work during your trip. Not all countries and territories require visas, but it’s best to stay up-to-date on regulations and requirements by doing your research and working with a travel agent. Immigration officials can revoke your visa at any time, and it’s important to remember that they never truly guarantee entry, especially in countries where visas are separate from formal entry permission. An official will likely review your circumstances once you arrive to determine whether or not you may enter.
Certain foreign maritime workers are eligible to apply for a Transportation Worker Identification Credential (TWIC) once in the U.S. If you, as a maritime industry worker, will perform services in secure port areas, your visa must be annotated “TWIC Letter Received.” Workers whose visas are not annotated will not be permitted by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to apply for a TWIC.
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^ Calder, Simon (24 April 2017). "Airline lobbying for a relaxation of draconian rules for London-Auckland travellers". The Independent. Retrieved 7 July 2018. Travellers heading west from the UK to New Zealand may soon be able to avoid the onerous requirement to clear US border control during the refuelling stop at Los Angeles airport (LAX). Unlike almost every other country in the world, the US insists on a full immigration check even for travellers who simply intend to re-board their plane to continue onwards to a foreign destination. Air New Zealand, which flies daily from Heathrow via Los Angeles to Auckland, says there are currently “strict requirements for travellers” in transit at LAX. Through passengers to Auckland on flight NZ1 or Heathrow on NZ2 must apply in advance for an ESTA (online visa) even though they have no intention of staying in the US. They also have to undergo screening by the Transportation Security Administration.
H2-B Seasonal Worker Visas are nonimmigrant visas offered for temporary, irregular, or seasonal work. Jobs that are needed on a "one-time" basis or to help a company during moments of heavy activity also qualify. To get an H-2B visa, the position cannot be in agriculture or farming. Working at a hotel during the busy summer season or helping in the construction of a single building project are both examples of jobs that will likely meet H-2B requirements. To be eligible for an H-2B visa you must also be a national of a qualifying country. Learn more about H2-B visas.
Using your preferred search engine, find the official government immigration website of the country you intend to visit. Once you’ve found and read all the information, including the visa application requirements, fill out the required travel visa application form. You may be able to send in the form electronically or you may be required to send it by mail. If your destination requires visa on arrival, then you don’t need to worry about applying for a travel visa beforehand. In this case, once you get to your destination you may be required to fill out a visa form and pay any applicable fees. Double check the requirements with the relevant website or consulate as you may need to bring a passport-sized photo as well.
With some countries, the validity of a visa is not the same as the authorised period of stay. The visa validity then indicates the time period when entry is permitted into the country. For example, if a visa has been issued to begin on January 1 and to expire on March 30, and the typical authorised period of stay in a country is 90 days, then the 90-day authorised stay starts on the day the passenger enters the country (entrance has to be between 1 January and 30 March). Thus, the latest day the traveller could conceivably stay in the issuing country is 1 July (if the traveller entered on 30 March). This interpretation of visas is common in the Americas.
Visa and MasterCard have a four party system.  They do not issue any credit cards.  Rather, they license their payment brands to Issuers and Acquirers.   Issuing banks are the entities that provide you, the consumer, with the credit cards in your pocket.  Acquirers are the entities that process the transactions.  We are part of the acquiring side.  As a registered Independent Sales Organization (ISO) of Visa and MasterCard, we pay them thousands of dollars a year for the privilege of using those brands.
An H-1B visa is a nonimmigrant visa used by American companies who wish to employ foreign workers in occupations that require college degrees or their equivalency. Most occupations for which foreign employees use the visa are in medicine, chemistry, engineering, biotechnology and the social sciences. Employees who are granted H-1B visas may only work for the sponsoring American company.
International travel can be incredibly confusing at times for everyone, from new explorers to seasoned globetrotters and everyone in between. With the research, the paperwork, and the actual trip-planning, it can be exhausting and frustrating for one to try and make sure they have all of the accurate information needed before embarking on their journey. Travelers often ask questions about passports and visas, with some of the most common questions being about visa validity.
Kuwait,[128] Lebanon,[129] Libya,[130] Saudi Arabia,[131] Sudan,[132] Syria,[133] and Yemen[134] do not allow entry to people with passport stamps from Israel or whose passports have either a used or an unused Israeli visa, or where there is evidence of previous travel to Israel such as entry or exit stamps from neighbouring border posts in transit countries such as Jordan and Egypt.
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