Generally, a citizen of a foreign country who wishes to enter the United States must first obtain a visa, either a nonimmigrant visa for a temporary stay, or an immigrant visa for permanent residence. Visitor visas are nonimmigrant visas for persons who want to enter the United States temporarily for business (visa category B-1), for tourism (visa category B-2), or for a combination of both purposes (B-1/B-2).
In October 2016 the Fair Work Ombudsman published a report following an inquiry into the wages and conditions of people working under the working holiday visa program, which highlighted exploitative workplace cultures where unreasonable and unlawful requirements were being imposed in some isolated and remote workplaces. If you have concerns about your workplace conditions or treatment you can contact the Fair Work Ombudsman on 13 13 94. You can also report concerns to them anonymously.
Entering a country without a valid visa or visa exemption may result in detention and removal (deportation or exclusion) from the country. Undertaking activities that are not authorised by the status of entry (for example, working while possessing a non-worker tourist status) can result in the individual being deemed liable for deportation—commonly referred to as an illegal alien. Such violation is not a violation of a visa, despite the common misuse of the phrase, but a violation of status; hence the term "out of status".

As an alternative to a hotel receipt, you can also present an invitation letter from a Chinese citizen or a foreigner with a residence permit. The letter should contain information about the applicant (such as your name, gender and date of birth), information about your stay in China (itinerary, length of stay, etc) and information about the person that is inviting you (name, telephone number, address, signature and copy of their Chinese identity card, or if the person isn’t Chinese, a copy of their passport pages containing their photo and residence permit).
With some countries, the validity of a visa is not the same as the authorised period of stay. The visa validity then indicates the time period when entry is permitted into the country. For example, if a visa has been issued to begin on January 1 and to expire on March 30, and the typical authorised period of stay in a country is 90 days, then the 90-day authorised stay starts on the day the passenger enters the country (entrance has to be between 1 January and 30 March). Thus, the latest day the traveller could conceivably stay in the issuing country is 1 July (if the traveller entered on 30 March). This interpretation of visas is common in the Americas.
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Azerbaijan also strictly bans any visit by foreign citizens to the separatist region of Nagorno-Karabakh[138] (the de facto independent Republic of Artsakh), its surrounding territories, and the Azerbaijani exclaves of Karki, Yuxarı Əskipara, Barxudarlı, and Sofulu which are de jure part of Azerbaijan but under the control of Armenia, without the prior consent of the government of Azerbaijan. Foreign citizens who enter these territories will be permanently banned from entering the Republic of Azerbaijan[139] and will be included in their "list of personae non gratae".[140] As of 21 February 2019, the list mentioned 803 people.
Some countries apply the principle of reciprocity in their visa policy. A country's visa policy is called 'reciprocal' if it imposes visa requirement against citizens of all the countries that impose visa requirements against its own citizens. The opposite is rarely true: a country rarely lifts visa requirements against citizens of all the countries that also lift visa requirements against its own citizens, unless a prior bilateral agreement has been made.
Tourist visas are common for those who travel for pleasure or for short medical procedures. They are not typically used for work, study or significant family business. Tourist visa restrictions and costs vary widely depending on the country, but many allow stays of from three to six months. Fees also vary widely, as does the application process. Each country’s intent in issuing both tourist and transit visas is to prevent travelers whom they consider high-security risks from entering their borders.
We are not a law firm, and this site and our software are not a substitute for the advice of a lawyer and do not contain or constitute legal advice. We are not affiliated with or sponsored by the United States government or any government agency. This site provides general information on some commonly encountered immigration matters only and was created to allow you to more simply navigate your completion of immigration paperwork using online software. The content on this site should not be relied on to reach conclusions about any person's specific situation. Self-help software and customer support services are provided solely at a user's direction. Customer support is for technical and billing issues only and will not answer legal questions. We do not provide legal advice, opinions, or recommendations about any individual's specific legal rights, remedies, defenses, options, or strategies. We do not make form recommendations or recommend or provide answers to specific questions on forms, and communications between you and us are not protected by any privilege. Purchase prices do not include applicable government agency filing or biometrics fees, if any. The forms that can be completed using our software can be obtained for free from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) as blank forms with written instructions. Automated eligibility quizzes were created using instructions, rules and regulations published by the USCIS and only indicate whether you meet minimum eligibility requirements to apply for the given immigration benefit. Quiz results do not guarantee eligibility or ineligibility as you may or may not be eligible based on reasons not addressed in the quizzes. Your access to and use of this site, including any purchase, is subject to and constitutes your agreement to the website Privacy Policy and Terms of Use. Refunds will only be issued if requested within thirty (30) days and before completed application is printed. Exceptions and restrictions may apply; see Refund Policy for details.
Every country processes visa applications at a different rate. Make sure to check the government website of the country you intend to visit to find out how fast they process visa applications. For example, visa applications from Russia to visit Canada take approximately 8 days to process, while Canadians looking to travel to India are advised to submit visa applications at least 15 days in advance.
International travel can be incredibly confusing at times for everyone, from new explorers to seasoned globetrotters and everyone in between. With the research, the paperwork, and the actual trip-planning, it can be exhausting and frustrating for one to try and make sure they have all of the accurate information needed before embarking on their journey. Travelers often ask questions about passports and visas, with some of the most common questions being about visa validity.
In addition, green card holders and certain other aliens must obtain a certificate of compliance (also known as a "sailing permit" or "departure permit") from the Internal Revenue Service proving that they are up-to-date with their US income tax obligations before they may leave the country.[114] While the requirement has been in effect since 1921, it has not been stringently enforced, but in 2014 the House Ways and Means Committee has considered to begin enforcing the requirement as a way to increase tax revenues.[115]
A visa is a stamp, sticker, or electronic record sitting inside your passport book that verifies that you’re allowed to stay in a specific country for a certain amount of time. They specify the length of your stay, what territories you may visit, your scheduled date of entry, how many times you may enter the country, and whether or not you’re allowed to study or work during your trip. Not all countries and territories require visas, but it’s best to stay up-to-date on regulations and requirements by doing your research and working with a travel agent. Immigration officials can revoke your visa at any time, and it’s important to remember that they never truly guarantee entry, especially in countries where visas are separate from formal entry permission. An official will likely review your circumstances once you arrive to determine whether or not you may enter.
Generally, a citizen of a foreign country who wishes to enter the United States must first obtain a visa, either a nonimmigrant visa for a temporary stay, or an immigrant visa for permanent residence. Visitor visas are nonimmigrant visas for persons who want to enter the United States temporarily for business (visa category B-1), for tourism (visa category B-2), or for a combination of both purposes (B-1/B-2).
Some visas can be granted on arrival or by prior application at the country's embassy or consulate, or through a private visa service specialist who is specialised in the issuance of international travel documents. These agencies are authorised by the foreign authority, embassy, or consulate to represent international travellers who are unable or unwilling to travel to the embassy and apply in person. Private visa and passport services collect an additional fee for verifying customer applications, supporting documents, and submitting them to the appropriate authority. If there is no embassy or consulate in one's home country, then one would have to travel to a third country (or apply by post) and try to get a visa issued there. Alternatively, in such cases visas may be pre-arranged for collection on arrival at the border. The need or absence of need of a visa generally depends on the citizenship of the applicant, the intended duration of the stay, and the activities that the applicant may wish to undertake in the country he visits; these may delineate different formal categories of visas, with different issue conditions.

Immigration law delegates the responsibility for issuance or refusal of visas to consular officers overseas. They have the final say on all visa cases. By regulation, the U.S. Department of State has authority to review consular decisions, but this authority is limited to the interpretation of law, as contrasted to determinations of facts. The question at issue in such denials, whether an applicant possesses the required residence abroad, is a factual one. Therefore, it falls exclusively within the authority of consular officers at our Foreign Service posts to resolve. An applicant can influence the post to change a prior visa denial only through the presentation of new convincing evidence of strong ties.
What Is a Visa?   |   What Is a Travel/Tourist Visa?   |   What Is a Work Visa?   |   What Is a Business Visa?   |   What Is a Student Visa?   |   What Is a Refugee/Asylum Visa?   |   What Is a Working Holiday Visa?   |   What Is a Spousal Visa?   |   What Is a Transit Visa?   |   What Is an eVisa?   |   Immigrant Vs. Nonimmigrant Visas   |   What Does a Visa Look Like?   |   Why Do I Need a Visa to Travel?   |   What Is a Visa Policy?   |   Why Do Certain Countries Have Visa Restrictions?   |   When Do I Need a Visa?   |   How Do I Apply for a Visa?   |   What Are the Requirements for a Visa?   |   What Are the Supporting Documents Required for Visitor Visas?   |   What Is an Invitation Letter for a Visa?   |   What to Expect During a Visa Interview?   |   What Are the Fees for Obtaining a Visa?   |   What Are Visa Processing Times?   |   What Visa Services Does an Embassy Offer?   |   What Can I Learn From the Visa Restrictions Index?   |   Which Countries Can I Travel to Visa-Free?   |   How Are Travel Visas Linked to My Passport?   |   Visa-Free Vs. Visa on Arrival Vs. Visa Required   |   What Are the US Visa Restrictions?   |   Which Countries Can I Visit Visa-Free With the US Passport?   |   How Many Visitor Visas Does the US Accept and Reject Each Year?   |   Which Countries Can I Visit With a Schengen Visa?   |   When Was the First Visa Ever Issued?   |   Global Visa Issuance Over Time
A visa is a stamp, sticker, or electronic record sitting inside your passport book that verifies that you’re allowed to stay in a specific country for a certain amount of time. They specify the length of your stay, what territories you may visit, your scheduled date of entry, how many times you may enter the country, and whether or not you’re allowed to study or work during your trip. Not all countries and territories require visas, but it’s best to stay up-to-date on regulations and requirements by doing your research and working with a travel agent. Immigration officials can revoke your visa at any time, and it’s important to remember that they never truly guarantee entry, especially in countries where visas are separate from formal entry permission. An official will likely review your circumstances once you arrive to determine whether or not you may enter.
Visa and MasterCard are international settlement & clearing houses that help transfer of funds from one entity to the other. For ex: You might have a credit card from XYZ Bank. If you need to use your credit card at a merchant shop, that shop would need to have a machine provided by XYZ bank installed. Only then the shop keeper can accept your payment using the XYZ card.
The "two-year rule" is the common term used for a section of U.S. immigration law which requires many exchange visitors to return to their home countries and be physically present there for at least two years after the conclusion of their exchange visit before they can return to the U.S. under certain types of visas, specifically H, K, L and immigrant visas. It is important to note that only a preliminary finding of whether the two-year rule applies to you is made on your DS-2019 when your J-1 visa is issued. The final decision will be made only if you later choose to apply for an H, L, K or immigrant visa.
Unfortunately, there is not one solid answer when it comes to the question of how long a visa lasts. Different countries have different regulations when it comes to letting in foreigners, and different visas are approved for different purposes. Some travelers need to stay in their destination country for lengthy periods of time due to business, study, or family emergencies. Other travelers are going abroad strictly for fun, and this could limit their length of stay depending on the destination. What’s most important is having an understanding of what type of visa you’re going to need on your journey, as this will allow you to apply for the correct documentation and acquire a visa that best suits your personal needs. It’s crucial that you do your research or seek out someone who can help you get off on the right foot, and Travel Visa Pro is here to help you gain a better understanding of the types of visas available.

No. If your visa is valid and unmarked or undamaged, you can travel with your two passports together (old and new), if the purpose of your travel matches your current nonimmigrant visa. Also, the name and other personal data must be the same in both passports (unless the name change was due to marriage), and both passports must be from the same country and of the same type (i.e., both tourist passports and both diplomatic passports).


In western Europe in the late 19th century and early 20th century, passports and visas were not generally necessary for moving from one country to another. The relatively high speed and large movements of people travelling by train would have caused bottlenecks if regular passport controls had been used.[5] Passports and visas became usually necessary as travel documents only after World War I.[6]
Finding that an entry visa to the United States has been granted is cause for great celebration for most applicants, but that celebration is often premature: Visas allow travelers to board their transportation to the U.S., but they by no means guarantee entry. You cannot stay in the U.S. at all with a visa alone. Determining officers of the Department of Homeland Security at the U.S. port of entry are empowered to turn away even people with visas and send them back where they came from if they sense some subterfuge or illegal intent.

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