Every country processes visa applications at a different rate. Make sure to check the government website of the country you intend to visit to find out how fast they process visa applications. For example, visa applications from Russia to visit Canada take approximately 8 days to process, while Canadians looking to travel to India are advised to submit visa applications at least 15 days in advance.


With some countries, the validity of a visa is not the same as the authorised period of stay. The visa validity then indicates the time period when entry is permitted into the country. For example, if a visa has been issued to begin on January 1 and to expire on March 30, and the typical authorised period of stay in a country is 90 days, then the 90-day authorised stay starts on the day the passenger enters the country (entrance has to be between 1 January and 30 March). Thus, the latest day the traveller could conceivably stay in the issuing country is 1 July (if the traveller entered on 30 March). This interpretation of visas is common in the Americas.
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It’s important to note that the visa duration granted only specifies a period during which the holder can travel to the US to apply for admission. The final decision to permit entry into the US and on the permitted length of stay will be made at the border by the United States Customs and Border Protection Officer when you attempt to enter the country.
^ Roberts, Jeff John (12 September 2016). "Homeland Security Plans to Expand Fingerprint and Eye Scanning at Borders". Fortune. Fortune Media IP Limited. Retrieved 24 April 2019. Unlike with documents, it’s very hard for a traveler to present a forged copy of a fingerprint or iris. That’s why the U.S. Department of Homeland Security plans to vastly expand the amount of biometric data it collects at the borders. According to Passcode, a new program will ramp up a process to scan fingers and eyes in order to stop people entering and exiting the country on someone else’s passport.
This site is managed by the U.S. Department of State. External links to other Internet sites and listings of private entities on this page are provided as a convenience and should not be construed as the U.S. Department of State or U.S. government endorsement of the entity, its views, the products or services it provides, or the accuracy of information contained therein. The order in which names appear has no significance, and the listings or links may be removed at any time at the discretion of the Department.
^ "China to Start Fingerprinting Foreign Visitors". Air Canada. 31 January 2019. Retrieved 7 July 2018. Effective April 27, 2018, border control authorities at all of China’s ports of entry, including its airports, will start collecting the fingerprints of all foreign visitors aged between 14 and 70. Diplomatic passport holders and beneficiaries of reciprocal agreements are exempted..
What Is a Visa?   |   What Is a Travel/Tourist Visa?   |   What Is a Work Visa?   |   What Is a Business Visa?   |   What Is a Student Visa?   |   What Is a Refugee/Asylum Visa?   |   What Is a Working Holiday Visa?   |   What Is a Spousal Visa?   |   What Is a Transit Visa?   |   What Is an eVisa?   |   Immigrant Vs. Nonimmigrant Visas   |   What Does a Visa Look Like?   |   Why Do I Need a Visa to Travel?   |   What Is a Visa Policy?   |   Why Do Certain Countries Have Visa Restrictions?   |   When Do I Need a Visa?   |   How Do I Apply for a Visa?   |   What Are the Requirements for a Visa?   |   What Are the Supporting Documents Required for Visitor Visas?   |   What Is an Invitation Letter for a Visa?   |   What to Expect During a Visa Interview?   |   What Are the Fees for Obtaining a Visa?   |   What Are Visa Processing Times?   |   What Visa Services Does an Embassy Offer?   |   What Can I Learn From the Visa Restrictions Index?   |   Which Countries Can I Travel to Visa-Free?   |   How Are Travel Visas Linked to My Passport?   |   Visa-Free Vs. Visa on Arrival Vs. Visa Required   |   What Are the US Visa Restrictions?   |   Which Countries Can I Visit Visa-Free With the US Passport?   |   How Many Visitor Visas Does the US Accept and Reject Each Year?   |   Which Countries Can I Visit With a Schengen Visa?   |   When Was the First Visa Ever Issued?   |   Global Visa Issuance Over Time
The United States has several visa restrictions that affect whether a potential visitor is granted a tourist visa. Visa applications may be denied on the grounds of health, a criminal record or other security reasons. For example, anyone with a significant communicable disease or a physical or mental health disorder that poses a safety threat will not be allowed entry into the US.
A social security card is used in the U.S. as way to prove your identity. Each social security card has a 9-digit social security number (SSN). This number is unique to each person and used for the purpose of tracking an individual in the U.S. Social Security Administration. All people who work in the U.S. must have a SSN. SSNs are mostly used for tax purposes.
If you intend to study in Australia, you will need to apply for a Student visa (subclass 500). If you are the parent, guardian or relative of a student, you can apply for a Student Guardian Visa (subclass 590). If you would like to travel to Australia for a visit and short-term study, you may be eligible for a visitor visa. A Training Visa (subclass 407) allows you to take part in workplace-based training to enhance your skills in your current occupation, area of tertiary study, field of expertise. A Temporary Activity Visa (subclass 408) permits temporary entry into Australia for certain programs and projects.
Yes. In general, you may apply to change your nonimmigrant visa status if you were lawfully admitted to the United States with a nonimmigrant visa, if your nonimmigrant status remains valid, if you have not violated the conditions of your status, and you have not committed any actions that would make you ineligible. For more details, please visit the USCIS website.
An East African Single Tourist Visa is under consideration by the relevant sectoral authorities under the East African Community (EAC) integration program. If approved the visa will be valid for all five partner states in the EAC (Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Rwanda and Burundi). Under the proposal for the visa, any new East African single visa can be issued by any partner state's embassy. The visa proposal followed an appeal by the tourist boards of the partner states for a common visa to accelerate promotion of the region as a single tourist destination and the EAC Secretariat wants it approved before November's World Travel Fair (or World Travel Market) in London.[96] When approved by the East African council of ministers, tourists could apply for one country's entry visa, which would then be applicable in all regional member states as a single entry requirement initiative.[97] This is considered also by COMESA.

On what basis would she be able to adjust status once in the U.S.? Of course she shouldn't do this. If immigration officials even *think she entered the U.S. on a tourist visa with the intention of immigrating, she'll never adjust status. It's never advisable to enter the U.S. on a tourist visa with the intent of immigrating. http://www.dixonimmigration.com/index.php?pid=2
The Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea) requires that its citizens obtain an exit visa stating the traveller's destination country and time to be spent abroad before leaving the country. Additionally, North Korean authorities also require North Korean citizens obtain a re-entry visa from a North Korean embassy or North Korean mission abroad before being allowed back into North Korea.
The "two-year rule" is the common term used for a section of U.S. immigration law which requires many exchange visitors to return to their home countries and be physically present there for at least two years after the conclusion of their exchange visit before they can return to the U.S. under certain types of visas, specifically H, K, L and immigrant visas. It is important to note that only a preliminary finding of whether the two-year rule applies to you is made on your DS-2019 when your J-1 visa is issued. The final decision will be made only if you later choose to apply for an H, L, K or immigrant visa.

At present, 38 countries in the Visa Waiver Program are Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brunei, Chile, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, San Marino, Singapore, Slovenia, Slovakia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan and the United Kingdom.
The Form I-20 is an official U.S. Government form, issued by a certified school, which a prospective nonimmigrant student must have in order to get an F-1 or M-1 visa. Form I-20 acts as proof-of-acceptance and contains the information necessary to pay the SEVIS I-901 fee, apply for a visa or change visa status, and be admitted into the United States. The Form I-20 has the student's SEVIS identification number, which starts with the letter N and is followed by ten digits, on the top left of the form.
Goods that you declare will be inspected by a biosecurity officer, who will assess the level of risk associated with the goods. In most cases, goods are low risk and will be returned to you after the inspection. However, if a biosecurity officer deems the goods to have some risk you can pay for the goods to be treated, pay to export the goods, or voluntarily dispose of the goods.

The Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea) requires that its citizens obtain an exit visa stating the traveller's destination country and time to be spent abroad before leaving the country. Additionally, North Korean authorities also require North Korean citizens obtain a re-entry visa from a North Korean embassy or North Korean mission abroad before being allowed back into North Korea.

VISAs are NOT required. 30-days Tourist Visa will be issued upon arrival and may be extended within 7 days in advance with approval of the Chief of Immigration for a fee of US$50.00 before expiration date of the visa. (Note: Maximum of 90 days: 30 days upon arrival plus 2 extensions at US$50.00 fee per extension. After which visitors must exit the country). Citizens of United States of America, Federated States of Micronesia, Republic of the Marshall Islands, Guam, and the Common Wealth of Northern Marianas Islands with valid passports are issued 1 year Visa upon arrival. Citizens of Myanmar and Bangladesh must have a pre-approved visa.
The "two-year rule" is the common term used for a section of U.S. immigration law which requires many exchange visitors to return to their home countries and be physically present there for at least two years after the conclusion of their exchange visit before they can return to the U.S. under certain types of visas, specifically H, K, L and immigrant visas. It is important to note that only a preliminary finding of whether the two-year rule applies to you is made on your DS-2019 when your J-1 visa is issued. The final decision will be made only if you later choose to apply for an H, L, K or immigrant visa.
O-1 Extraordinary Ability Worker Visas are nonimmigrant visas for individuals who possess great talent in the sciences, arts, education, business, athletics, or the motion picture or television industry. Note that the terms "arts" also includes "culinary arts", and essential personnel in the art field such as: directors, set designers, choreographers, orchestrators, coaches, arrangers, costume designers, make-up artists, state technicians and animal trainers.
The issuing authority may also require applicants to attest that they have no criminal convictions, or that they not participate in certain activities (like prostitution or drug trafficking). Some countries will deny visas if travellers' passports show evidence of citizenship of, or travel to, a country that is considered hostile by that country. For example, some Arabic-oriented countries will not issue visas to nationals of Israel and those whose passports bear evidence of visiting Israel.
Temporary worker visa, for approved employment in the host country. These are generally more difficult to obtain but valid for longer periods of time than a business visa. Examples of these are the United States' H-1B and L-1 visas. Depending on a particular country, the status of temporary worker may or may not evolve into the status of permanent resident or to naturalization.
So, for example, someone who arrives in the U.S. with a fiancé visa (K-1) and applies for a work permit will receive one that lasts only until the 90-day termination of that person’s K-1 visa. Although it might sound like this would create problems for fiancés who plan to apply for green cards after marriage and stay in the United States, it actually doesn’t. That’s because the fiance can simply apply to adjust status as soon as they’ve gotten married, and then apply for an EAD that lasts even longer, at that time.
The expiry date on your visa is the last day you may enter the U.S., not the day that you must be out of the U.S. You may arrive in the U.S. right up to midnight of the last date of validity indicated on the visa. The Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officer on arrival determines the duration of your stay in the U.S. Your visa can expire while you are still in the U.S. – just be sure that you do not overstay the period of time the CBP officer grants you.

As of 2019, the Henley & Partners passport index ranks the Japanese, Singaporean and South Korean passports as the ones with the most visa exemptions by other nations, allowing holders of those passports to visit 189 countries without obtaining a visa in advance of arrival.[89] However, as of 6 June 2019, the Passport Index ranks the United Arab Emirates passport as the one with the most visa exemptions by other nations, allowing holders of this passport to visit 173 countries[90] without obtaining a visa in advance of arrival.
To have a smaller worldwide diplomatic staff, some countries rely on other country's (or countries') judgments when issuing visas. For example, Mexico allows citizens of all countries to enter without Mexican visas if they possess a valid American visa that has already been used. Costa Rica accepts valid visas of Schengen/EU countries, Canada, Japan, South Korea and the United States (if valid for at least 3 months on date of arrival). The ultimate example of such reliance is Andorra, which imposes no visa requirements of its own because it has no international airport and is inaccessible by land without passing through the territory of either France or Spain and is thus "protected" by the Schengen visa system.
In general, to obtain a visa it will take four business days. To get a visa in 2-3 business days you can apply for the Express Service (it costs an additional 20 USD); while to get a visa within one business day you can apply for Rush Service (which costs an additional 30 USD). Note that the Rush Service is granted only in documented cases of extreme urgency.
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^ LIPTON, Eric (15 December 2006). "Administration to Drop Effort to Track if Visitors Leave". The New York Times. Retrieved 25 April 2019. Efforts to determine whether visitors actually leave have faltered. Departure monitoring would help officials hunt for foreigners who have not left, if necessary. Domestic security officials say, however, it would be too expensive to conduct fingerprint or facial recognition scans for land departures.
The EVUS website is now open to the public for enrollments at www.EVUS.gov.  CBP will not collect a fee for EVUS enrollment at this time. CBP anticipates the eventual implementation of an EVUS enrollment fee, but does not have a time frame. Until the implementation of a fee, travelers can enroll in EVUS without charge.  The Department of Homeland Security, Customs and Border Protection (CBP) will keep visa holders informed of new information throughout the year. For further information, please visit www.cbp.gov/EVUS.‎

In Chrysogelou's case, she qualified for a visa waiver for her trip to the United States. And while the waiver was valid when she began her trip, the German-based Lufthansa imposes an additional requirement: Passengers must have valid documents for the "entire duration" of their stay. (After I asked Lufthansa about her case, it rescheduled her flights to her original dates.)
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