On what basis would she be able to adjust status once in the U.S.? Of course she shouldn't do this. If immigration officials even *think she entered the U.S. on a tourist visa with the intention of immigrating, she'll never adjust status. It's never advisable to enter the U.S. on a tourist visa with the intent of immigrating. http://www.dixonimmigration.com/index.php?pid=2
Tourist visas and transit visas are very similar in many ways. The major difference is that a tourist visa allows a traveler to spend more time enjoying the country while a transit visa simply gives the traveler enough time to pass through to the final destination. The host country’s visa requirements will tell you which visa is appropriate for your travel needs.

You need a valid passport before applying for a visa. The visa application process may take several weeks and generally must be completed before leaving home. For many countries the application and fee is the same for either a tourist or transit visa. A typical process for obtaining a visa is to complete an application and send it to the country’s embassy along with your original passport, a passport photo, the required fee and any other required documents. Additionally a transit visa application may require documents that verify that you will in fact be leaving the country within the required time period. Each country’s unique visa requirements are found online or by contacting that country’s embassy. Some countries like Colombia, Japan and many European countries do not require a visa for shorter stays.
Tourist visas and transit visas are very similar in many ways. The major difference is that a tourist visa allows a traveler to spend more time enjoying the country while a transit visa simply gives the traveler enough time to pass through to the final destination. The host country’s visa requirements will tell you which visa is appropriate for your travel needs.
The issuing authority may also require applicants to attest that they have no criminal convictions, or that they not participate in certain activities (like prostitution or drug trafficking). Some countries will deny visas if travellers' passports show evidence of citizenship of, or travel to, a country that is considered hostile by that country. For example, some Arabic-oriented countries will not issue visas to nationals of Israel and those whose passports bear evidence of visiting Israel.

According to the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System in their June 2009 Report to the Congress on the Profitability of Credit Card Operations of Depository Institutions, there are 565 million general purpose credit cards labeled Visa or MasterCard.  There are another 111 million general purpose credit cards provided by American Express and Discover.
A country’s visa policy is a rule that states who may or may not enter the country. The policy may allow passport holders of one country to enter visa-free but not the passport holders of another country. Most visa policies are bilateral, meaning that two countries will allow visa-free travel to each other’s citizens, but this is not always the case. For example, Canadian passport holders may travel to Grenada visa-free, but Grenadians must apply for a visa in order to travel to Canada.
Some countries apply the principle of reciprocity in their visa policy. A country's visa policy is called 'reciprocal' if it imposes visa requirement against citizens of all the countries that impose visa requirements against its own citizens. The opposite is rarely true: a country rarely lifts visa requirements against citizens of all the countries that also lift visa requirements against its own citizens, unless a prior bilateral agreement has been made.
Citizens of Canada and Mexico may be eligible for NAFTA Professional (TN) Nonimmigrant status if they work in a qualifying profession. TN status is very similar to H-1B status. To be eligible, you must have a higher education degree, or its equivalent, and a job offer from a U.S. employer. However, if you do not have a degree but have acquired similar skills after working for several years in a specialty occupation, you may also be eligible. Learn more about NAFTA work visas.

Both B1 and B2 are visas for temporary stay in US. The B1 visa is business visa and can be used by the applicant to travel to US for business related issues. The B2 visa is tourist visa and the applicant can visit places and must have entered US only for touring purposes. No activities of any financial gain must be carried out during visit by the tourist visa holder. Both B1 and B2 visa…
In general, to obtain a visa it will take four business days. To get a visa in 2-3 business days you can apply for the Express Service (it costs an additional 20 USD); while to get a visa within one business day you can apply for Rush Service (which costs an additional 30 USD). Note that the Rush Service is granted only in documented cases of extreme urgency.

Citizens of Canada and Mexico may be eligible for NAFTA Professional (TN) Nonimmigrant status if they work in a qualifying profession. TN status is very similar to H-1B status. To be eligible, you must have a higher education degree, or its equivalent, and a job offer from a U.S. employer. However, if you do not have a degree but have acquired similar skills after working for several years in a specialty occupation, you may also be eligible. Learn more about NAFTA work visas.


Some countries apply the principle of reciprocity in their visa policy. A country's visa policy is called 'reciprocal' if it imposes visa requirement against citizens of all the countries that impose visa requirements against its own citizens. The opposite is rarely true: a country rarely lifts visa requirements against citizens of all the countries that also lift visa requirements against its own citizens, unless a prior bilateral agreement has been made.
If you're traveling internationally, you might need a visa, which is an endorsement on your passport indicating that you may enter a country. Americans don't need visas to enter 116 countries – including 26 in Europe – for short-term tourism, business or layovers on the way to a non-treaty country. However, some popular destinations such as China and Brazil do require U.S. citizens to obtain visas.
The following table lists visa policies of all countries by the number of foreign nationalities that may enter that country for tourism without a visa or by obtaining a visa on arrival with normal passport. It also notes countries that issue electronic visas to certain nationalities. Symbol "+" indicates a country that limits the visa-free regime negatively by only listing nationals who require a visa, thus the number represents the number of UN member states reduced by the number of nationals who require a visa and "+" stands for all possible non-UN member state nationals that might also not require a visa. "N/A" indicates countries that have contradictory information on its official websites or information supplied by the Government to IATA. Some countries that allow visa on arrival do so only at a limited number of entry points. Some countries such as the European Union member states have a qualitatively different visa regime between each other as it also includes freedom of movement.
According to the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System in their June 2009 Report to the Congress on the Profitability of Credit Card Operations of Depository Institutions, there are 565 million general purpose credit cards labeled Visa or MasterCard.  There are another 111 million general purpose credit cards provided by American Express and Discover.
If you are planning urgent travel to the United States, you will need to contact our helpline informing that you have urgent need for your passport and request for an update of your visa application. You will have to wait for the response from the Embassy/Consulate. When your passport/document is returned to you, it will be delivered to the document delivery address you have provided at the time of appointment scheduling.
Applicants are generally advised to apply in their country of permanent residence. Any person who is legally present in Australia may apply for a visa at one of the Consulates. However, applicants should decide where to apply based on more than just convenience or delay in getting an appointment in their home district. One thing to consider, for example, is in which consular district the applicant can demonstrate the strongest ties.
A visa (from the Latin charta visa, meaning "paper that has been seen")[1] is a conditional authorisation granted by a territory to a foreigner, allowing them to enter, remain within, or to leave that territory. Visas typically may include limits on the duration of the foreigner's stay, areas within the country they may enter, the dates they may enter, the number of permitted visits or an individual's right to work in the country in question. Visas are associated with the request for permission to enter a territory and thus are, in most countries, distinct from actual formal permission for an alien to enter and remain in the country. In each instance, a visa is subject to entry permission by an immigration official at the time of actual entry, and can be revoked at any time. A visa most commonly takes the form of a sticker endorsed in the applicant's passport or other travel document.
To combat visa runs, some countries have limits on how long visitors can spend in the country without a visa, as well as how much time they have to stay out before "resetting the clock". For example, Schengen countries impose a maximum limit for visitors of 90 days in any 180-day period. Some countries do not "reset the clock" when a visitor comes back after visiting a neighbouring country. For example, the United States does not give visitors a new period of stay when they come back from visiting Canada, Mexico or the Caribbean; instead they are readmitted to the United States for the remaining days granted on their initial entry. Some other countries, e.g. Thailand, allow visitors who arrive by land from neighbouring countries a shorter length of stay than those who arrive by air.
Citizens of Canada and Mexico may be eligible for NAFTA Professional (TN) Nonimmigrant status if they work in a qualifying profession. TN status is very similar to H-1B status. To be eligible, you must have a higher education degree, or its equivalent, and a job offer from a U.S. employer. However, if you do not have a degree but have acquired similar skills after working for several years in a specialty occupation, you may also be eligible. Learn more about NAFTA work visas.
Certain foreign maritime workers are eligible to apply for a Transportation Worker Identification Credential (TWIC) once in the U.S. If you, as a maritime industry worker, will perform services in secure port areas, your visa must be annotated “TWIC Letter Received.” Workers whose visas are not annotated will not be permitted by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to apply for a TWIC.

The expiry date on your visa is the last day you may enter the U.S., not the day that you must be out of the U.S. You may arrive in the U.S. right up to midnight of the last date of validity indicated on the visa. The Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officer on arrival determines the duration of your stay in the U.S. Your visa can expire while you are still in the U.S. – just be sure that you do not overstay the period of time the CBP officer grants you.


Iraq, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates all have an exit visa requirement for alien foreign workers. This is part of their kafala work visa sponsorship system. Consequently, at the end of a foreign worker's employment period, the worker must secure clearance from their employer stating that the worker has satisfactorily fulfilled the terms of their employment contract or that the worker's services are no longer needed. The exit visa can also be withheld if there are pending court charges that need to be settled or penalties that have to be meted out. In September 2018, Qatar lifted the exit visa requirement for most workers.[102]

Generally, a citizen of a foreign country who wishes to enter the United States must first obtain a visa, either a nonimmigrant visa for a temporary stay, or an immigrant visa for permanent residence. Visitor visas are nonimmigrant visas for persons who want to enter the United States temporarily for business (visa category B-1), for tourism (visa category B-2), or for a combination of both purposes (B-1/B-2).
An ASEAN common visa scheme has been considered with Thailand and the "CLMV" countries of Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar and Vietnam opting in earlier. After talk arose of a CLMV common visa,[91] with Thailand being omitted, Thailand initiated and began implementation of a trial common visa with Cambodia, but cited security risks as the major hurdle. The trial run was delayed,[92] but Thailand implemented a single visa scheme with Cambodia beginning on December 27, 2012, on a trial basis.[93]
Countries have visa restrictions in order to check and control the flow of visitors in and out of the country and to prevent illegal immigration and other criminal activities. Forcing travellers to apply for a visa allows the authorities to vet potential visitors. For example, individuals may attempt to travel to a country with better economic opportunities in order to work illegally there.

The validity of a U.S. work permit, also referred to as an Employment Authorization Document (EAD), will vary. The time-frame is dependent on the applicant’s current legal status in the U.S., whether this is the applicant’s first time applying, or if it is being renewed. If a person obtained his or her work permit while applying for Adjustment of Status (AOS) for the first time, their work permit is likely to be valid for one year, unless otherwise specified by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).
^ "Countries whose citizens are allowed to enter Turkey with their expired passports". Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Republic of Turkey. Archived from the original on 8 October 2015. Retrieved 6 July 2018. Countries whose citizens are allowed to enter Turkey with their expired passports: 1. Germany – Passports expired within the last year / ID’s expired within the last year, 2. Belgium - Passports expired within the last 5 years, 3. France - Passports expired within the last 5 years, 4. Spain - Passports expired within the last 5 years, 5. Switzerland - Passports expired within the last 5 years, 6. Luxemburg - Passports expired within the last 5 years, 7. Portugal - Passports expired within the last 5 years, 8. Bulgaria – Valid ordinary passport

A visa is a stamp, sticker, or electronic record sitting inside your passport book that verifies that you’re allowed to stay in a specific country for a certain amount of time. They specify the length of your stay, what territories you may visit, your scheduled date of entry, how many times you may enter the country, and whether or not you’re allowed to study or work during your trip. Not all countries and territories require visas, but it’s best to stay up-to-date on regulations and requirements by doing your research and working with a travel agent. Immigration officials can revoke your visa at any time, and it’s important to remember that they never truly guarantee entry, especially in countries where visas are separate from formal entry permission. An official will likely review your circumstances once you arrive to determine whether or not you may enter.
Previously, foreign travelers granted entry by CBP officials received a paper Form I-94 (Arrival/Departure Record). This process is now automated, with some exceptions. If you received a paper Form I-94 or I-94W and failed to turn in your paper Form I-94 Arrival/Departure Record to the commercial airline or CBP when you departed the U.S., see the CBP Website for instructions. Do not send your paper Form I-94 or I-94W to the U.S. Embassy or Consulate General.
In the past passengers who were arriving in the U.S. via air or sea used to have to complete a paper Form I-94 (or Form I-94W for Visa Waiver Program travelers). This is no longer required as the arrival and departure information and records that the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) gathers is now automated. Passengers arriving in the U.S. via a land border, however, will still be issued a paper Form I-94/Form I-94W to complete. All travelers are required to complete the Customs Declaration form 6059B, but only one Customs Declaration form is required for a family traveling together.
An East African Single Tourist Visa is under consideration by the relevant sectoral authorities under the East African Community (EAC) integration program. If approved the visa will be valid for all five partner states in the EAC (Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Rwanda and Burundi). Under the proposal for the visa, any new East African single visa can be issued by any partner state's embassy. The visa proposal followed an appeal by the tourist boards of the partner states for a common visa to accelerate promotion of the region as a single tourist destination and the EAC Secretariat wants it approved before November's World Travel Fair (or World Travel Market) in London.[96] When approved by the East African council of ministers, tourists could apply for one country's entry visa, which would then be applicable in all regional member states as a single entry requirement initiative.[97] This is considered also by COMESA.
So, for example, someone who arrives in the U.S. with a fiancé visa (K-1) and applies for a work permit will receive one that lasts only until the 90-day termination of that person’s K-1 visa. Although it might sound like this would create problems for fiancés who plan to apply for green cards after marriage and stay in the United States, it actually doesn’t. That’s because the fiance can simply apply to adjust status as soon as they’ve gotten married, and then apply for an EAD that lasts even longer, at that time.
On what basis would she be able to adjust status once in the U.S.? Of course she shouldn't do this. If immigration officials even *think she entered the U.S. on a tourist visa with the intention of immigrating, she'll never adjust status. It's never advisable to enter the U.S. on a tourist visa with the intent of immigrating. http://www.dixonimmigration.com/index.php?pid=2
A valid U.S. visa in an expired passport is still valid. Unless canceled or revoked, a visa is valid until its expiration date. If you have a valid visa in your expired passport, do not remove it from your expired passport. You may use your valid visa in your expired passport along with a new valid passport for travel and admission to the United States. 
In the absence of specific bilateral agreements, countries requiring passports to be valid for at least 6 more months on arrival include Afghanistan, Algeria, Anguilla, Bahrain,[119] Bhutan, Botswana, British Virgin Islands, Brunei, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Cayman Islands, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Curaçao, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Fiji, Gabon, Guinea Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Israel,[120] Jordan, Kenya, Kiribati, Kuwait, Laos, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Mongolia, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Oman, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Qatar, Rwanda, Samoa, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Tanzania, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Tokelau, Tonga, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, Vanuatu, Venezuela, and Vietnam.[121]
The United States of America does not require exit visas. Since October 1, 2007, however, the U.S. government requires all foreign and U.S. nationals departing the United States by air to hold a valid passport (or certain specific passport-replacing documents). Even though travellers might not require a passport to enter a certain country, they will require a valid passport booklet (booklet only, U.S. Passport Card not accepted) to depart the United States in order to satisfy the U.S. immigration authorities.[113] Exemptions to this requirement to hold a valid passport include:
Visas can also be single-entry, which means the visa is cancelled as soon as the holder leaves the country; double-entry, or multiple-entry, which permits double or multiple entries into the country with the same visa. Countries may also issue re-entry permits that allow temporarily leaving the country without invalidating the visa. Even a business visa will normally not allow the holder to work in the host country without an additional work permit.
In accordance with the agreement signed between the United States and China to extend visa validity, beginning on November 29, 2016, Chinese citizens with 10-year B1, B2 or B1/B2 visas in Peoples’ Republic of China passports will be required to update their biographical and other information from their visa application via a website every two years, or upon getting a new passport or B1, B2, or B1/B2 visa, whichever occurs first.  This mechanism is called EVUS - Electronic Visa Update System.
Azerbaijan also strictly bans any visit by foreign citizens to the separatist region of Nagorno-Karabakh[138] (the de facto independent Republic of Artsakh), its surrounding territories, and the Azerbaijani exclaves of Karki, Yuxarı Əskipara, Barxudarlı, and Sofulu which are de jure part of Azerbaijan but under the control of Armenia, without the prior consent of the government of Azerbaijan. Foreign citizens who enter these territories will be permanently banned from entering the Republic of Azerbaijan[139] and will be included in their "list of personae non gratae".[140] As of 21 February 2019, the list mentioned 803 people.
In addition, green card holders and certain other aliens must obtain a certificate of compliance (also known as a "sailing permit" or "departure permit") from the Internal Revenue Service proving that they are up-to-date with their US income tax obligations before they may leave the country.[114] While the requirement has been in effect since 1921, it has not been stringently enforced, but in 2014 the House Ways and Means Committee has considered to begin enforcing the requirement as a way to increase tax revenues.[115]
The courier will attempt to deliver your passport only at the address you selected or provided when you scheduled your interview. If the courier is unable to deliver, for example, because no one is home, the courier will leave a notice indicating they attempted delivery. If you receive a notice like this, contact Toll Priority on 131 531 immediately. If your passport is not delivered to you within fifteen calendar days, it will be returned to the Consulate. If this happens, contact the call center for assistance.
{"PageInfo":{"component":"PageInfo"},"Banner":{"component":"Banner","rightImageAlt":"Need help planning your Australian holiday? Get insider knowledge from a local Aussie Specialist.","price":"0","pricePerText":"","moreInformationURL":"","currency":"$","text":"","title":""},"Hero":{"component":"Hero","subTitle":"","title":"Visa, customs and quarantine FAQ","playerId":""}}
Uniquely, the Norwegian special territory of Svalbard is an entirely visa-free zone under the terms of the Svalbard Treaty. Some countries—such as those in the Schengen Area—have agreements with other countries allowing each other's citizens to travel between them without visas. The World Tourism Organization announced that the number of tourists requiring a visa before travelling was at its lowest level ever in 2015.[3][4]
The term “visa” is a shortening of a Latin phrase, carta visa, which means “the document has been seen.” These documents take a number of forms, ranging from tourist to immigration visas, and each type has its own application process. For example, someone who wants to enter a country to do business would need to apply for a business visa, while someone who planned to relocate to a country would apply for an immigration visa that would allow him to enter the country and stay there for a set period of time while pursuing citizenship or residency permits.

If you're traveling internationally, you might need a visa, which is an endorsement on your passport indicating that you may enter a country. Americans don't need visas to enter 116 countries – including 26 in Europe – for short-term tourism, business or layovers on the way to a non-treaty country. However, some popular destinations such as China and Brazil do require U.S. citizens to obtain visas.

US Customs and Border Protection requires that visitors from abroad substantiate they have sufficient funds to enter the USA. The amount is not a fixed number, however, and does not have to be solely in cash; credit cards, traveller's cheques and other currency equivalents are considered. For more information, check the USCBP's website (www.cbp.gov).
VISAs are NOT required. 30-days Tourist Visa will be issued upon arrival and may be extended within 7 days in advance with approval of the Chief of Immigration for a fee of US$50.00 before expiration date of the visa. (Note: Maximum of 90 days: 30 days upon arrival plus 2 extensions at US$50.00 fee per extension. After which visitors must exit the country). Citizens of United States of America, Federated States of Micronesia, Republic of the Marshall Islands, Guam, and the Common Wealth of Northern Marianas Islands with valid passports are issued 1 year Visa upon arrival. Citizens of Myanmar and Bangladesh must have a pre-approved visa.

Some types of visa like B1 may not expire with the expiry of the holder's passport. An unexpired, endorsed visa in an expired passport may be presented for entry into the USA, as long as the visa itself has not been cancelled, is undamaged, is less than 10 years old and is presented with a valid non-expired passport, provided that both passports are for the same nationality.
×