"The only sure way to know if you have the right visa is to visit the official government website for the destination country and check the requirements for your passport," says Eric Wychopen, a frequent traveler and blogger based in Maastricht, Netherlands. "Going by the experience of other travelers or even relying on third-party visa providers is not a guarantee that your entry documentation is in order."

^ Encompasses Schengen member states - Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland as well as Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus and Romania and countries without border controls - Monaco, San Marino, Vatican and a country accessible only via Schengen area - Andorra.
The Special Education Exchange Visitors program is for people who wish to receive educational training for children with physical, mental or emotional disabilities (special education). To be eligible for an H-3 visa of this type you must be currently studying for a degree in special education, have a degree in special education, or have years of experience teaching special education.
Some countries apply the principle of reciprocity in their visa policy. A country's visa policy is called 'reciprocal' if it imposes visa requirement against citizens of all the countries that impose visa requirements against its own citizens. The opposite is rarely true: a country rarely lifts visa requirements against citizens of all the countries that also lift visa requirements against its own citizens, unless a prior bilateral agreement has been made.
^ "Countries whose citizens are allowed to enter Turkey with their expired passports". Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Republic of Turkey. Archived from the original on 8 October 2015. Retrieved 6 July 2018. Countries whose citizens are allowed to enter Turkey with their expired passports: 1. Germany – Passports expired within the last year / ID’s expired within the last year, 2. Belgium - Passports expired within the last 5 years, 3. France - Passports expired within the last 5 years, 4. Spain - Passports expired within the last 5 years, 5. Switzerland - Passports expired within the last 5 years, 6. Luxemburg - Passports expired within the last 5 years, 7. Portugal - Passports expired within the last 5 years, 8. Bulgaria – Valid ordinary passport
^ Encompasses Schengen member states - Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland as well as Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus and Romania and countries without border controls - Monaco, San Marino, Vatican and a country accessible only via Schengen area - Andorra.
The United States is an open society. Unlike many other countries, the United States does not impose internal controls on most visitors, such as registration with local authorities. Our immigration law requires consular officers to view every visa applicant as an intending immigrant until the applicant proves otherwise. In order to enjoy the privilege of unencumbered travel in the United States, you have a responsibility to prove you are going to return abroad before a visitor or student visa is issued.
Azerbaijan also strictly bans any visit by foreign citizens to the separatist region of Nagorno-Karabakh[138] (the de facto independent Republic of Artsakh), its surrounding territories, and the Azerbaijani exclaves of Karki, Yuxarı Əskipara, Barxudarlı, and Sofulu which are de jure part of Azerbaijan but under the control of Armenia, without the prior consent of the government of Azerbaijan. Foreign citizens who enter these territories will be permanently banned from entering the Republic of Azerbaijan[139] and will be included in their "list of personae non gratae".[140] As of 21 February 2019, the list mentioned 803 people.

A visa is a stamp, sticker, or electronic record sitting inside your passport book that verifies that you’re allowed to stay in a specific country for a certain amount of time. They specify the length of your stay, what territories you may visit, your scheduled date of entry, how many times you may enter the country, and whether or not you’re allowed to study or work during your trip. Not all countries and territories require visas, but it’s best to stay up-to-date on regulations and requirements by doing your research and working with a travel agent. Immigration officials can revoke your visa at any time, and it’s important to remember that they never truly guarantee entry, especially in countries where visas are separate from formal entry permission. An official will likely review your circumstances once you arrive to determine whether or not you may enter.

The issuing authority may also require applicants to attest that they have no criminal convictions, or that they not participate in certain activities (like prostitution or drug trafficking). Some countries will deny visas if travellers' passports show evidence of citizenship of, or travel to, a country that is considered hostile by that country. For example, some Arabic-oriented countries will not issue visas to nationals of Israel and those whose passports bear evidence of visiting Israel.

Because obtaining a visa can be complicated and time-consuming, Travisa does that work for you! We assist individuals, travel agents, and corporate travel departments to meet travel deadlines and requirements. We are not a government agency, but we work directly with passport agencies and embassies to ensure that your travel plans go smoothly. From out innovative order tracking system letting you know where you passport is at all times; to our easy online ordering – Travisa is the passport and visa processor to use "When you need it fast!"


A visa or travel visa is a document which gives someone permission to travel into a specific country and stay there for a set period of time. They may be stamped or glued directly into a passport for convenience, or they may be issued separately, in the form of documents which must be carefully protected to ensure that they are not lost or stolen. Some nations require everyone who enters to get a visa, while others have what are known as reciprocal agreements with certain nations which waive such requirements. It is important to research visa requirements before traveling internationally, as in some cases travelers must apply before they attempt to cross a border.
Some types of visa like B1 may not expire with the expiry of the holder's passport. An unexpired, endorsed visa in an expired passport may be presented for entry into the USA, as long as the visa itself has not been cancelled, is undamaged, is less than 10 years old and is presented with a valid non-expired passport, provided that both passports are for the same nationality.
Generally, a citizen of a foreign country who wishes to enter the United States must first obtain a visa, either a nonimmigrant visa for a temporary stay, or an immigrant visa for permanent residence. Visitor visas are nonimmigrant visas for persons who want to enter the United States temporarily for business (visa category B-1), for tourism (visa category B-2), or for a combination of both purposes (B-1/B-2).
Previously, foreign travelers granted entry by CBP officials received a paper Form I-94 (Arrival/Departure Record). This process is now automated, with some exceptions. If you received a paper Form I-94 or I-94W and failed to turn in your paper Form I-94 Arrival/Departure Record to the commercial airline or CBP when you departed the U.S., see the CBP Website for instructions. Do not send your paper Form I-94 or I-94W to the U.S. Embassy or Consulate General.
Some countries, such as Canada and the United States, may require the visitor to include a letter of invitation with their travel visa application. A letter of invitation is a formal letter from the person you intend to visit stating that they are inviting you to visit them in that country. Invitation letters help travel authorities vet potential visitors by making sure that a temporary visit is indeed the true nature of the visa request. Check with your intended destination’s government website for details on what needs to be included in a such a letter.
With a work visa you can travel to the U.S. to work in a specific occupation, profession or job. Work visas are temporary (nonimmigrant) visas, which means you can only work in the U.S. for a set period of time. Some examples of nonimmigrant work visas are: H-1B Specialty Work, H-2B Seasonal Work, H-3 Trainee, L-1 Intra-Company Transfer, O-1 Extraordinary Ability Worker, and NAFTA Worker Visa.

Goods that you declare will be inspected by a biosecurity officer, who will assess the level of risk associated with the goods. In most cases, goods are low risk and will be returned to you after the inspection. However, if a biosecurity officer deems the goods to have some risk you can pay for the goods to be treated, pay to export the goods, or voluntarily dispose of the goods.


The "two-year rule" is the common term used for a section of U.S. immigration law which requires many exchange visitors to return to their home countries and be physically present there for at least two years after the conclusion of their exchange visit before they can return to the U.S. under certain types of visas, specifically H, K, L and immigrant visas. It is important to note that only a preliminary finding of whether the two-year rule applies to you is made on your DS-2019 when your J-1 visa is issued. The final decision will be made only if you later choose to apply for an H, L, K or immigrant visa.
^ Brown, Theresa Cardinal (9 May 2016). "Biometric Entry-Exit Update: CBP Developing Land Border Process". Bipartisan Policy Center. Retrieved 25 April 2019. While a requirement for a biometric entry-exit system has been in law for over a decade, it is not yet a reality. Many reasons for the long gestating development have been documented in BPC’s 2014 report Entry-Exit System: Progress, Challenges, and Outlook, including the technological, operational, and cost challenges of creating exit systems and infrastructure where none exist today. However, many critics, especially in Congress, simply accused the Department of Homeland security of dragging its feet... the major operational, logistical, and technical challenge in implementing exit capability at our ports has been the land borders. Unlike airports and seaports, the land border environment is not physically controlled, there is no means to get advance information on who is arriving, and the sheer volume of travel—both vehicular and pedestrian—creates challenges in any system to not further exacerbate delays. While biometric exit for land vehicular traffic is still in the “what if” stage, CBP is moving ahead and piloting systems and technology to use with the large population of pedestrian crossers at the U.S.-Mexico border.
Azerbaijan also strictly bans any visit by foreign citizens to the separatist region of Nagorno-Karabakh[138] (the de facto independent Republic of Artsakh), its surrounding territories, and the Azerbaijani exclaves of Karki, Yuxarı Əskipara, Barxudarlı, and Sofulu which are de jure part of Azerbaijan but under the control of Armenia, without the prior consent of the government of Azerbaijan. Foreign citizens who enter these territories will be permanently banned from entering the Republic of Azerbaijan[139] and will be included in their "list of personae non gratae".[140] As of 21 February 2019, the list mentioned 803 people. 

In Chrysogelou's case, she qualified for a visa waiver for her trip to the United States. And while the waiver was valid when she began her trip, the German-based Lufthansa imposes an additional requirement: Passengers must have valid documents for the "entire duration" of their stay. (After I asked Lufthansa about her case, it rescheduled her flights to her original dates.)
The United States is an open society. Unlike many other countries, the United States does not impose internal controls on most visitors, such as registration with local authorities. Our immigration law requires consular officers to view every visa applicant as an intending immigrant until the applicant proves otherwise. In order to enjoy the privilege of unencumbered travel in the United States, you have a responsibility to prove you are going to return abroad before a visitor or student visa is issued.
The United States has several visa restrictions that affect whether a potential visitor is granted a tourist visa. Visa applications may be denied on the grounds of health, a criminal record or other security reasons. For example, anyone with a significant communicable disease or a physical or mental health disorder that poses a safety threat will not be allowed entry into the US.

Unfortunately, there is not one solid answer when it comes to the question of how long a visa lasts. Different countries have different regulations when it comes to letting in foreigners, and different visas are approved for different purposes. Some travelers need to stay in their destination country for lengthy periods of time due to business, study, or family emergencies. Other travelers are going abroad strictly for fun, and this could limit their length of stay depending on the destination. What’s most important is having an understanding of what type of visa you’re going to need on your journey, as this will allow you to apply for the correct documentation and acquire a visa that best suits your personal needs. It’s crucial that you do your research or seek out someone who can help you get off on the right foot, and Travel Visa Pro is here to help you gain a better understanding of the types of visas available.
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