The unofficial posture is that few people can afford to live without working for more than six months. Because people coming to the U.S. on B2 visas are not allowed to work, they will in all likelihood be issued a maximum six-month I-94. If the entrant is seeking medical treatment that may quite reasonably be expected to take more than six months, the determining officer can issue a one-year I-94 without consulting a supervisor. A traveler with a B1 professional visa, meaning they have work the State Department has already determined is acceptable under all its conditions, can stay up to three years on a single I-94. In an extreme circumstance, then, a person with a one-month B1 visa could legally stay in the USA for three years, not one month.
Goods that you declare will be inspected by a biosecurity officer, who will assess the level of risk associated with the goods. In most cases, goods are low risk and will be returned to you after the inspection. However, if a biosecurity officer deems the goods to have some risk you can pay for the goods to be treated, pay to export the goods, or voluntarily dispose of the goods.

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The Central American Single Visa (Visa Única Centroamericana) is a visa for Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, and Nicaragua. It was implemented by the CA-4 agreement. It allows citizens of those four countries free access to other member countries. It also allows visitors to any member country to enter another member country without having to obtain another visa.
Generally, a citizen of a foreign country who wishes to enter the United States must first obtain a visa, either a nonimmigrant visa for a temporary stay, or an immigrant visa for permanent residence. Visitor visas are nonimmigrant visas for persons who want to enter the United States temporarily for business (visa category B-1), for tourism (visa category B-2), or for a combination of both purposes (B-1/B-2).
We are not a law firm, and this site and our software are not a substitute for the advice of a lawyer and do not contain or constitute legal advice. We are not affiliated with or sponsored by the United States government or any government agency. This site provides general information on some commonly encountered immigration matters only and was created to allow you to more simply navigate your completion of immigration paperwork using online software. The content on this site should not be relied on to reach conclusions about any person's specific situation. Self-help software and customer support services are provided solely at a user's direction. Customer support is for technical and billing issues only and will not answer legal questions. We do not provide legal advice, opinions, or recommendations about any individual's specific legal rights, remedies, defenses, options, or strategies. We do not make form recommendations or recommend or provide answers to specific questions on forms, and communications between you and us are not protected by any privilege. Purchase prices do not include applicable government agency filing or biometrics fees, if any. The forms that can be completed using our software can be obtained for free from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) as blank forms with written instructions. Automated eligibility quizzes were created using instructions, rules and regulations published by the USCIS and only indicate whether you meet minimum eligibility requirements to apply for the given immigration benefit. Quiz results do not guarantee eligibility or ineligibility as you may or may not be eligible based on reasons not addressed in the quizzes. Your access to and use of this site, including any purchase, is subject to and constitutes your agreement to the website Privacy Policy and Terms of Use. Refunds will only be issued if requested within thirty (30) days and before completed application is printed. Exceptions and restrictions may apply; see Refund Policy for details.

H-3 Trainee or Special Education Exchange Visas are nonimmigrant visas that allow you to travel to the U.S. for training. The main goal of this visa is to receive training in the U.S. that you will later use in your home country. To qualify, the training cannot be available in your home country or related to graduate medical studies. During the application process, an immigration officer will ask you to show that you intend to return to your home country after the program is completed.
A visa does not guarantee entry into the United States, but allows a foreign citizen coming from abroad to travel to a U.S. port of entry and request permission to enter the United States. The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officials have authority to permit or deny admission to the United States, and determine how long a traveler may stay. At the port of entry, upon granting entry to the United States, the Customs and Border Protection officer will stamp your travel document with the date of admission, the class of admission (i.e. VWP traveler, or the visa classification for visa holders, or other permissible class of entry), and the date that you are allowed to remain until, that is the date by which you must leave the United States. You can review information about admission on the CBP website. The Department of State's Consular Affairs website has more information about duration of stay.
In addition, green card holders and certain other aliens must obtain a certificate of compliance (also known as a "sailing permit" or "departure permit") from the Internal Revenue Service proving that they are up-to-date with their US income tax obligations before they may leave the country.[114] While the requirement has been in effect since 1921, it has not been stringently enforced, but in 2014 the House Ways and Means Committee has considered to begin enforcing the requirement as a way to increase tax revenues.[115]
Citizens of Canada and Mexico may be eligible for NAFTA Professional (TN) Nonimmigrant status if they work in a qualifying profession. TN status is very similar to H-1B status. To be eligible, you must have a higher education degree, or its equivalent, and a job offer from a U.S. employer. However, if you do not have a degree but have acquired similar skills after working for several years in a specialty occupation, you may also be eligible. Learn more about NAFTA work visas.
Our consular officers have a difficult job. They must decide in a very short time if someone is qualified to receive a temporary visa. Most cases are decided after a brief interview and review of whatever evidence of ties an applicant presents. To qualify for a visitor or student visa, an applicant must meet the requirements of sections 101(a)(15)(B) or (F) of the INA respectively. Failure to do so will result in a refusal of a visa under INA 214(b). The most frequent basis for such a refusal concerns the requirement that the prospective visitor or student possess a residence abroad he/she has no intention of abandoning. Applicants prove the existence of such residence by demonstrating that they have ties abroad that would compel them to leave the U.S. at the end of the temporary stay. The law places this burden of proof on the applicant.
Tourist visas are common for those who travel for pleasure or for short medical procedures. They are not typically used for work, study or significant family business. Tourist visa restrictions and costs vary widely depending on the country, but many allow stays of from three to six months. Fees also vary widely, as does the application process. Each country’s intent in issuing both tourist and transit visas is to prevent travelers whom they consider high-security risks from entering their borders.

This site is managed by the U.S. Department of State. External links to other Internet sites and listings of private entities on this page are provided as a convenience and should not be construed as the U.S. Department of State or U.S. government endorsement of the entity, its views, the products or services it provides, or the accuracy of information contained therein. The order in which names appear has no significance, and the listings or links may be removed at any time at the discretion of the Department.

You do not need to create another profile if it is also serviced by CGI. You can simply contact us through the Contact Us section on this website and share your passport number, UID or email address so we can retrieve and update your profile with the new country where you plan to apply for your US Visa. If you are applying in a country that is not covered by CGI, you will be invited to create a new profile. As a reminder, MRV fee receipts paid in one country are non-transferable to the other country.
F academic students: Duration of status (D/S), meaning for as long as you remain enrolled, full-time, in an educational program at an approved school; are making normal progress toward completing your course of study; and are in compliance with all the terms of your F-1 status. You’re allowed a 60-day grace period to prepare to leave the United States. No extension application needed.

Uniquely, the Norwegian special territory of Svalbard is an entirely visa-free zone under the terms of the Svalbard Treaty. Some countries—such as those in the Schengen Area—have agreements with other countries allowing each other's citizens to travel between them without visas. The World Tourism Organization announced that the number of tourists requiring a visa before travelling was at its lowest level ever in 2015.[3][4]
P athletes, entertainers, and artists: The time period necessary to accomplish the event or activity, plus ten days before the validity period of the visa petition and up to ten days after the petition expires. Initially up to five years for athletes, one year for other artists and entertainers. Extensions possible. Ten-year maximum for athletes; no maximum on others.
Some visas can be granted on arrival or by prior application at the country's embassy or consulate, or through a private visa service specialist who is specialised in the issuance of international travel documents. These agencies are authorised by the foreign authority, embassy, or consulate to represent international travellers who are unable or unwilling to travel to the embassy and apply in person. Private visa and passport services collect an additional fee for verifying customer applications, supporting documents, and submitting them to the appropriate authority. If there is no embassy or consulate in one's home country, then one would have to travel to a third country (or apply by post) and try to get a visa issued there. Alternatively, in such cases visas may be pre-arranged for collection on arrival at the border. The need or absence of need of a visa generally depends on the citizenship of the applicant, the intended duration of the stay, and the activities that the applicant may wish to undertake in the country he visits; these may delineate different formal categories of visas, with different issue conditions.
On what basis would she be able to adjust status once in the U.S.? Of course she shouldn't do this. If immigration officials even *think she entered the U.S. on a tourist visa with the intention of immigrating, she'll never adjust status. It's never advisable to enter the U.S. on a tourist visa with the intent of immigrating. http://www.dixonimmigration.com/index.php?pid=2
The EVUS website is now open to the public for enrollments at www.EVUS.gov.  CBP will not collect a fee for EVUS enrollment at this time. CBP anticipates the eventual implementation of an EVUS enrollment fee, but does not have a time frame. Until the implementation of a fee, travelers can enroll in EVUS without charge.  The Department of Homeland Security, Customs and Border Protection (CBP) will keep visa holders informed of new information throughout the year. For further information, please visit www.cbp.gov/EVUS.‎
Unfortunately, there is not one solid answer when it comes to the question of how long a visa lasts. Different countries have different regulations when it comes to letting in foreigners, and different visas are approved for different purposes. Some travelers need to stay in their destination country for lengthy periods of time due to business, study, or family emergencies. Other travelers are going abroad strictly for fun, and this could limit their length of stay depending on the destination. What’s most important is having an understanding of what type of visa you’re going to need on your journey, as this will allow you to apply for the correct documentation and acquire a visa that best suits your personal needs. It’s crucial that you do your research or seek out someone who can help you get off on the right foot, and Travel Visa Pro is here to help you gain a better understanding of the types of visas available.
I would say a tourist visa (6 month) is best because a fiance visa limits your time and is not one that can be renewed like a tourist visa. You can renew a tourist visa for 6 months. It does not always get approved but it is something that is possible with the tourist and not with the fiance visa. Now if you plan on getting married as stated in the fiance visa then in…
A general certificate of health is not required by CDC for pet cats and dogs entering the United States, although some airlines or states may require them. Certain states require vaccination for rabies, check with state and local health authorities at your final destination. Dogs must have a certificate showing they have been vaccinated against rabies greater than or equal to 30 days prior to entry into the United States, unless they're coming from rabies free countries. All pet cats and dogs arriving in the state of Hawaii and the territory of Guam are subject to locally imposed quarantine requirements. Many animals are not allowed to be brought into the USA; you can find a complete list on the US Customs and Border Protection website (www.cbp.gov).
The CARICOM Visa was introduced in late 2006 and allowed visitors to travel between 10 CARICOM member states (Antigua & Barbuda, Barbados, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, St. Kitts & Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent & the Grenadines and Trinidad and Tobago). These ten member countries had agreed to form a "Single Domestic Space" in which travellers would only have their passport stamped and have to submit completed, standardised entry and departure forms at the first port and country of entry. The CARICOM Visa was applicable to the nationals of all countries except CARICOM member states (other than Haiti) and associate member states, Canada, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, South Africa, the United Kingdom, the United States of America and the overseas countries, territories or departments of these countries. The CARICOM Visa could be obtained from the Embassies/Consulates of Barbados, Jamaica and Trinidad & Tobago and in countries that have no CARICOM representatives, the applications forms could be obtained from the embassies and consulates of the United Kingdom. The common visa was only intended for the duration of the 2007 Cricket World Cup and was discontinued on May 15, 2007. Discussions are ongoing into instituting a revised CARICOM visa on a permanent basis in the future.
This document may be denied for any number of reasons. People with certain infectious diseases, for example, may be told to seek treatment for those diseases before a visa will be issued. They may also be denied to people who could potentially strain the system of the country they are visiting: for example, someone without enough money to get by might be denied a visa out of concern that he or she could rely on public assistance for help.
J visa holders subject to the two-year rule are not permitted to remain in the United States and apply for an adjustment/change of status to a prohibited nonimmigrant status (for example, from a J visa to an H visa) or to apply for legal permanent resident status (Green Card) without first returning home for two years or obtaining an approved waiver. Whether you are subject to the two-year rule is determined by a number of factors, including your source of funding and your country's "Skills List." It is not determined by the amount of time you spend in the United States.

Certain parts of the country have been designated protected or restricted areas that require special permits and in some cases prior government authorisation. You should indicate your intent to visit a specific restricted region when applying for a visa and a permit will be granted to visit that region only. It is advised that you apply for the special permit for restricted areas when you enter India by visiting the FRRO (Foreign Regional Registration Office) that has offices in all major Indian airports and cities. You must complete an additional form, but there is no fee for a restricted area permit.
The visa or the completed Visa Waiver Program document permits non-immigrant travelers to enter upon U.S. soil only to the extent that they can present themselves to a determining Department of Homeland Security official. The official and his work station are euphemistically referred to as "the gate." The document that demonstrates permission to enter the country has been granted is universally called an I-94 -- the proper term is Arrival/Departure Record -- and it is issued by the determining officer at the gate. In simple terms, the visa allows the traveler to knock on the door; the I-94 card is proof the Department of Homeland Security has allowed them to come in. The I-94 determines the time limit of the stay, and the restrictions imposed upon the visitor while in the U.S. Visas do not allow any stay of any length within the U.S.
H-2B temporary skilled and unskilled workers: Depends on the labor certification and the proposed period of employment, plus a period of up to ten days before the validity period of the H-2B petition begins and ten days after it ends. Initial maximum of 12 months, with extensions of up to a year possible, limited by an overall maximum of three years.
To combat visa runs, some countries have limits on how long visitors can spend in the country without a visa, as well as how much time they have to stay out before "resetting the clock". For example, Schengen countries impose a maximum limit for visitors of 90 days in any 180-day period. Some countries do not "reset the clock" when a visitor comes back after visiting a neighbouring country. For example, the United States does not give visitors a new period of stay when they come back from visiting Canada, Mexico or the Caribbean; instead they are readmitted to the United States for the remaining days granted on their initial entry. Some other countries, e.g. Thailand, allow visitors who arrive by land from neighbouring countries a shorter length of stay than those who arrive by air.
Tourist visas and transit visas are very similar in many ways. The major difference is that a tourist visa allows a traveler to spend more time enjoying the country while a transit visa simply gives the traveler enough time to pass through to the final destination. The host country’s visa requirements will tell you which visa is appropriate for your travel needs.

An ASEAN common visa scheme has been considered with Thailand and the "CLMV" countries of Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar and Vietnam opting in earlier. After talk arose of a CLMV common visa,[91] with Thailand being omitted, Thailand initiated and began implementation of a trial common visa with Cambodia, but cited security risks as the major hurdle. The trial run was delayed,[92] but Thailand implemented a single visa scheme with Cambodia beginning on December 27, 2012, on a trial basis.[93]
Generally, a citizen of a foreign country who wishes to enter the United States must first obtain a visa, either a nonimmigrant visa for a temporary stay, or an immigrant visa for permanent residence. Visitor visas are nonimmigrant visas for persons who want to enter the United States temporarily for business (visa category B-1), for tourism (visa category B-2), or for a combination of both purposes (B-1/B-2).

As of 2019, the Henley & Partners passport index ranks the Japanese, Singaporean and South Korean passports as the ones with the most visa exemptions by other nations, allowing holders of those passports to visit 189 countries without obtaining a visa in advance of arrival.[89] However, as of 6 June 2019, the Passport Index ranks the United Arab Emirates passport as the one with the most visa exemptions by other nations, allowing holders of this passport to visit 173 countries[90] without obtaining a visa in advance of arrival.


Previously, foreign travelers granted entry by CBP officials received a paper Form I-94 (Arrival/Departure Record). This process is now automated, with some exceptions. If you received a paper Form I-94 or I-94W and failed to turn in your paper Form I-94 Arrival/Departure Record to the commercial airline or CBP when you departed the U.S., see the CBP Website for instructions. Do not send your paper Form I-94 or I-94W to the U.S. Embassy or Consulate General.
On what basis would she be able to adjust status once in the U.S.? Of course she shouldn't do this. If immigration officials even *think she entered the U.S. on a tourist visa with the intention of immigrating, she'll never adjust status. It's never advisable to enter the U.S. on a tourist visa with the intent of immigrating. http://www.dixonimmigration.com/index.php?pid=2 

The visa or the completed Visa Waiver Program document permits non-immigrant travelers to enter upon U.S. soil only to the extent that they can present themselves to a determining Department of Homeland Security official. The official and his work station are euphemistically referred to as "the gate." The document that demonstrates permission to enter the country has been granted is universally called an I-94 -- the proper term is Arrival/Departure Record -- and it is issued by the determining officer at the gate. In simple terms, the visa allows the traveler to knock on the door; the I-94 card is proof the Department of Homeland Security has allowed them to come in. The I-94 determines the time limit of the stay, and the restrictions imposed upon the visitor while in the U.S. Visas do not allow any stay of any length within the U.S.
Our consular officers have a difficult job. They must decide in a very short time if someone is qualified to receive a temporary visa. Most cases are decided after a brief interview and review of whatever evidence of ties an applicant presents. To qualify for a visitor or student visa, an applicant must meet the requirements of sections 101(a)(15)(B) or (F) of the INA respectively. Failure to do so will result in a refusal of a visa under INA 214(b). The most frequent basis for such a refusal concerns the requirement that the prospective visitor or student possess a residence abroad he/she has no intention of abandoning. Applicants prove the existence of such residence by demonstrating that they have ties abroad that would compel them to leave the U.S. at the end of the temporary stay. The law places this burden of proof on the applicant.
To be eligible, you must have a higher education degree, or its equivalent, and a job offer from a U.S. employer. However, if you do not have a degree but have acquired similar skills after working for several years in a specialty occupation, you may also be eligible. The more qualified and specialized you are, the easier it will for you to receive an H-1B work visa.
US Customs and Border Protection requires that visitors from abroad substantiate they have sufficient funds to enter the USA. The amount is not a fixed number, however, and does not have to be solely in cash; credit cards, traveller's cheques and other currency equivalents are considered. For more information, check the USCBP's website (www.cbp.gov).
Holders of UK passports with the endorsement British Subject, British Dependent Territories Citizen, British Protected Person, British Overseas Citizen or British National (Overseas) Citizen do not qualify for the Visa Waiver Program. A passport which states holder has right of abode or indefinite leave to remain in the UK does not qualify for visa-free travel too.

H-1B temporary workers in specialty occupations and distinguished fashion models: Depends on the validity period of the labor condition application and the proposed period of employment, plus a period of up to ten days before the validity period of the H-1B petition begins and ten days after it ends. Most H-1B workers are initially granted up to a three-year stay. Extensions are allowed up to a maximum total stay of six years (with exceptions, notably for persons who are seeking permanent residence through the job). After getting your H-1B, any time you spend outside the U.S. is added on to and extends your three years.


Temporary worker visa, for approved employment in the host country. These are generally more difficult to obtain but valid for longer periods of time than a business visa. Examples of these are the United States' H-1B and L-1 visas. Depending on a particular country, the status of temporary worker may or may not evolve into the status of permanent resident or to naturalization.
The expiration date of your visa is the last day you may use the visa to enter the U.S. It does not indicate how long you may stay in the U.S. Your stay is determined by the Department of Homeland Security at the port of entry. As long as you comply with the Department of Homeland Security decision on the conditions of your stay, you should have no problem.
Iraq, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates all have an exit visa requirement for alien foreign workers. This is part of their kafala work visa sponsorship system. Consequently, at the end of a foreign worker's employment period, the worker must secure clearance from their employer stating that the worker has satisfactorily fulfilled the terms of their employment contract or that the worker's services are no longer needed. The exit visa can also be withheld if there are pending court charges that need to be settled or penalties that have to be meted out. In September 2018, Qatar lifted the exit visa requirement for most workers.[102]
Citizens of member states of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations do not require tourist visas to visit another member state, with the exception of Myanmar. Until 2009, Burmese citizens were required to have visas to enter all other ASEAN countries. Following the implementation of visa exemption agreements with the other ASEAN countries, in 2016 Burmese citizens are only required to have visas to enter Malaysia and Singapore. Myanmar and Singapore had agreed on a visa exemption scheme set to be implemented on 1 December 2016.[88] ASEAN citizens are entitled to use the Burmese visa on arrival facility.

Countries requiring passports with a validity of at least 3 months beyond the date of intended departure include European Union countries (except the Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom); Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, Switzerland (all with an exception made for EEA and Swiss nationals). Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Nauru, Moldova, and New Zealand also require 3 months validity beyond the date of the bearer's intended departure.


Some countries, including the Czech Republic,[111] require that an alien who needs a visa on entry be in possession of a valid visa upon exit. To satisfy this formal requirement, exit visas sometimes need to be issued. Russia requires an exit visa if a visitor stays past the expiration date of their visa. They must then extend their visa or apply for an exit visa and are not allowed to leave the country until they show a valid visa or have a permissible excuse for overstaying their visa (e.g., a note from a doctor or a hospital explaining an illness, missed flight, lost or stolen visa). In some cases, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs can issue a return-Home certificate that is valid for ten days from the embassy of the visitor's native country, thus eliminating the need for an exit visa.
In Chrysogelou's case, she qualified for a visa waiver for her trip to the United States. And while the waiver was valid when she began her trip, the German-based Lufthansa imposes an additional requirement: Passengers must have valid documents for the "entire duration" of their stay. (After I asked Lufthansa about her case, it rescheduled her flights to her original dates.)
A country’s visa policy is a rule that states who may or may not enter the country. The policy may allow passport holders of one country to enter visa-free but not the passport holders of another country. Most visa policies are bilateral, meaning that two countries will allow visa-free travel to each other’s citizens, but this is not always the case. For example, Canadian passport holders may travel to Grenada visa-free, but Grenadians must apply for a visa in order to travel to Canada.
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